Homeschool, Public, & Private. Oh My!

Homeschool, Public, & Private. Oh My!

Written by David Seibel | 9.19.2019

Educational options abound for your student. Rather than selling you on what I think is best, I want to share with you the opportunities for educating your child: public, private, and homeschool. Rather than sharing my opinion, I want to give you resources that have been helpful to me.

Seeking a Christian Education  

First, I want to commend this video from the Gospel Coalition on choosing education for your children. These pastors have thought deeply about the best educational options available.

Dr. Juan Sanchez has raised five girls and has experienced all three educational options: homeschool, public, and private. I love his emphasis on the need for parents to be the primary disciple-makers and to be intentional in cultivating the spiritual life of their children. His quote is critical: “You can take your kids out of the world, but you cannot the world out of your kids.”

In other words, the heart of the problem is the problem of the heart. This truth ought to remind parents that homeschooling or private education does not guarantee a life character, faith, and scholarship. I believe the best question for parents to answer is, “What is best?”

“You can take your kids out of the world, but you cannot the world out of your kids.”

“You can take your kids out of the world, but you cannot the world out of your kids.”

In the video, Sam Allberry says, “There are going to be dangers and drawbacks with any route. It’s not like one route is always problem-free. That’s why we need to have freedom—and allow each other to have freedom.” I tend to agree with Sam that we ought not to be overly restrictive in what we recommend to other families. However, I would offer one caveat: some community public schools lack such virtue that Christian families ought not to consider them.

“Does this kind of education not actually imply that God is not the source of all knowledge and truth?”

“Does this kind of education not actually imply that God is not the source of all knowledge and truth?”

An Alternative Viewpoint

On the other end of the spectrum from Allberry is an article in The Federalist by Aaron Ames entitled “Why Christian Children Don’t Belong in Public Schools.

When you compare the position of Ames with that of Allbery, it presents a valid tension to Christian parents. Maybe Christian kids should not be in public schools!

Ames’ question is helpful: “But what are we to make of a student who has spent 15 to 20 years studying academics without ever considering God’s relationship to these fields of knowledge? Does this kind of education not actually imply that God is not the source of all knowledge and truth?”

His question needs to be answered by those who send their kids to public schools.

The connection of subjects in Christian Education has deepened my faith and given me a comprehensive vision of all things.

The connection of subjects in Christian Education has deepened my faith and given me a comprehensive vision of all things.

A Christian Education – Not an Exodus

I have so enjoyed making connections between different subject areas (like Literature, Math, Logic, Latin, History) to theology. This connection has deepened my faith and given me a comprehensive vision of all things. C.S. Lewis’ words explain well why I love Christian education. “I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.”

Now, there are ministries like The Exodus Mandate that claim the government is Egypt, and we need to be like Moses and cry, “Let my people go!” The government schools enslave God’s students to secular humanistic slavery. But instead of making bricks without straw, they are doing math on iPads through Common Core. These organizations feel a bit more extreme than Jesus at times in their content.

A Guiding Resource

The best resource I can share is from a podcast called Risen Motherhood. They created a short field guide for people of faith making the educational decision for their kids.

Their six driving questions are well-written:

  1. What does the Bible say about education?
  2. What options for education do your children currently have access to?
  3. What are your motives?
  4. What are your current life circumstances?
  5. Have you considered the individual needs of your child?
  6. What is the vision for your family?

A Final Encouragement

Grace over guilt every time. If you knew that you had God’s favor either way, what would you do? That may very well be the best decision for you and your child!

As Head of School at Coram Deo Academy, Dave Seibel aims to cultivate a generation of scholar-disciples who are passionate about learning. He is husband to Brooke and father of four future Coram Deo students. He is a graduate of Wabash College, Marian University and in final Master of Divinity course at Southern Seminary.

As Head of School at Coram Deo Academy, Dave Seibel aims to cultivate a generation of scholar-disciples who are passionate about learning. He is husband to Brooke and father of four future Coram Deo students. He is a graduate of Wabash College, Marian University and in final Master of Divinity course at Southern Seminary.

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